Abstract Friday’s . . .

Image of a broken mirror was captured in an alley. I am always looking for things I have never seen before. The broken mirror with the reflection of the blue sky, telephone wires, and the golden-colored building intrigue me. All the essentials were already there – light, color, and of course the gesture of the broken mirror. A slight move in any direction revealed a wonderful, new abstract expression. When you find a subject like this, let yourself go and play! Above all, photography should be fun!

Watchman of the Gulf . . .

These focused pelicans were keeping a watchful eye on the approaching fishing boats near Galveston harbor. A Nikon 300mm Phase Fresnel lens was the tool of choice for good subject isolation from the background. As a result, their gestures against the unobtrusive background takes center stage, which is what I wanted.

Morning Delight . . .

An early morning amble revealed this spring flower to me. As a photographer, I am always on the lookout for the delicacies of nature. Image captured faithfully in-camera. No need to improve on what natures does so well. 

Winter Frolic . . .

The horses frolicking during a recent Texas snowfall (last Sunday) was captured in our neighbor’s pasture. Thanks to my wonderful wife for holding the umbrella keeping the snow off me and my Nikon! Now that’s what I call “teamwork”! 

A Heavenly Sign . . .

A recent photo sojourn to one of my favorite Texas State Parks proved to be a most wonderous event! Near the end of my walk, I stopped by the edge of a lake looking for any last photo opportunities before leaving. After a few minutes, I was drawn to look upward and noticed a striking cloud formation. Within moments, I observed the formation of a cross in the cobalt-colored blue sky. I was mesmerized! My very being felt transposed, lighter and more absorbing. A sense of overwhelming joy penetrated me.

It was truly a spiritual, indelible experience I will cherish for the rest of my amazing time on earth! There are signs everywhere . . . when we take the time to focus our attention. Psalm 19:1 (NIV) The heavens declare the glory of God; the skies proclaim the work of his hands.

I did manage to capture a few frames during those two minutes of visual and emotional bliss. Technical Data: The attached image (actual, non-manipulated) was taken with a Nikon D850/Nikon 24mm f1.8 @f8, and a shutter speed of 1/500 sec. Time at moment of capture, 3:40pm (CST).

“There is always, always something to be thankful for.”

Celebrate the wonder of this Thanksgiving holiday with people who celebrate you!

Image captured on a misty morning in the foothills of the Julian Alps, Slovenia. I used my favorite landscape and all-around camera, a Nikon D850 with a Nikon 70-200mm at 200mm. I love using longer glass when shooting because of the additional compression that takes place. As a result, the soft, misty background was brought in to a closer relationship with the foreground, which helped to evoke a painterly quality to the photograph.

Reduce the Tussle . . .

I think photographers often tussle too much with their art. I have always believed that simplicity was the key to better photography. Over the years, I have seen a great many photographers try too hard in order to create the perfect picture. Often to the detriment of the subject before them. They include everything but the kitchen sink in their photograph! Which is a sure recipe for what I have termed image dilution; too much information in your photograph. I think the artist Leonardo da Vinci had this in mind when he expressed so eloquently, “Simplicity is the ultimate sophistication.” Learn to say more with less.

When I feel myself struggling with the endless search for the perfect composition, perspective, gesture, narrative, point of view, etc., I take a step back and quiet my mind for a few moments. I stop trying so hard. Such was the case with the photograph of the nearly twenty-foot, hand-painted Moroccan door. A feast for the photographer’s eye! So many possibilities, so many choices of artistic execution. I could have chosen to include the entire door, which I felt was a bit too busy. While observing the door from a closer perspective, I became more aware of the beautiful gold colored latch! All I had to do was refine my vision and reduce the extraneous. I simplified my approach and the result was a most delightful surprise. It had always been there waiting to be expressed.

The next time you feel overwhelmed with your photographic subject whatever it may be, take a few moments to quiet your inner thoughts. Relax your being. Simplify your approach. If you let it, the answers will come in a more crystalline form than you thought possible!